Airplane Ride

One day last week one of the mechanics, Jim, and I were the only ones in the lunch room. He served as a pilot in Africa for thirty years, flying with SIM. He’s still with them, but has been essentially farmed out to JAARS. In addition to starting up their flight service in Niger, he’s also a mechanic and a talented sketch artist. I got him to give me a couple of stories.

“When I was based out of Niamey, Niger,” he started, (things in quotes are more paraphrase than direct quotation) “there was a little boy, about three years old, who loved airplanes. His parents were with World Vision, working up in the desert with the Tuareg people, and every time they came to Niamey he would run around the hangar and look at all the airplanes.

“The World Vision base was out in the desert about two hundred miles north of Niamey. One evening, they had a party or celebration there, and all of the kids were playing around outside. Well, in the dark, this little boy ran across the cover of a dry well – it was rotted through, and gave way. He fell thirty feet, straight down. When the adults lowered someone down on a rope to pull him out, the three-year-old was completely unconscious, and his head was starting to swell. They sent a radio call out to Niamey for Jim to take him to the clinic, and for a plane to be ready to take him to Europe for treatment, if needed. Continue reading

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Helios and Ground Loops

Helio Courier in the hangar

I hope you all had a great Thanksgiving! Mine was pretty fun. Two of the families from the hangar get together every year for the meal, so they invited me to join them … good times!

I heard a number of stories last week, so I’ll spread them out over the next few days. I also met some people:

Ray is a pilot-mechanic serving in Cameroon. I’d guess he’s in his mid-thirties; he and his family are at the JAARS center to do his recertifications. (Most of the pilots that JAARS picks to serve overseas have to have extensive flying hours, as well as the FAA Airframe and Powerplant mechanic certifications.) He’s pretty tall, and nearly bald, and when I met him near my apartment on Tuesday he was taking out the trash. He recognized me from the aviation department meeting on Monday, and stopped to say hello. We got to talking, and it turns out that his father is a professor of philosophy at Notre Dame, so he knows some people at Purdue. The base in Cameroon, he told me, has a Robinson R44 helicopter and three light aircraft, including a Cessna 206. (We’ve got a PC-6 in the hangar that will be ready to go back there soon.) They had been working out of a really old, small hangar until recently, when they finished work on a new hangar. However, they’re still pretty understaffed. Cameroon is the only base that Wycliffe/JAARS has in Africa, although the different mission aviation organizations do work together. Continue reading

JAARS (More Plans)

courtesy of http://www.jaars.org/files/images/m_2009-09-25-12.03.30kmpj9605.jpg

I got an email yesterday, informing me that my volunteer application for JAARS has been accepted. This means that I’ll be spending the next few weeks, until Christmas, volunteering at Wycliffe’s center in North Carolina. I’ll also be flying back to Dallas just after Thanksgiving for a site interview with SpaceX, which means I get to see my folks, too!

So what am I doing, exactly?

I’ve known for awhile that I’d like to take this time in between school and a “real job” to make an impact on present-day issues. I tossed around the idea of going to Afghanistan to work with women, realized that I’d be really bored if I weren’t around engineering or machines, and applied for a Fall 2011 internship with Engineering Ministries International. I was disappointed when that didn’t work out, but in hindsight it was actually good, as I didn’t finish my graduate work at the end of the summer. Right now, I have a nice little gap between finishing school and January, when I would expect a job to start. Adventure time! Continue reading

…And More Plans

Dear Family and Friends, especially the ones who care about me,

Just a quick update on what will be going in my life:

My schedule for getting my thesis and research done was really cramped, and my advisor decided I was accelerating the process too much, so I’m now looking at an official graduation date in December 2011. I should be defending sometime before mid-October.

Thanks very much to all of you who have been praying for me. I’m mostly glad I have some more time; I’d rather turn out quality work than a rushed, half-finished job. It will also give me more time to look for a job, which has kind of fallen by the wayside as I’ve been pushing my thesis through.

I feel like I suddenly have a summer vacation! I’ll be in Texas for a week in July and in San Diego at the beginning of August, if anybody wants to find a time to catch up.

Please be in prayer for:

  • Me finding housing/a roommate – everybody around here leases for a year at a time only
  • My experiments getting done
  • My sisters finding housing/transportation at their respective new schools.

 

But Mousie, thou are no thy-lane,
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best laid schemes o’ Mice an’ Men,
Gang aft agley

-Robert Burns

Fragments

I don’t have anything specific in mind for this post; just a random bunch of thoughts that aren’t really related – colored pebbles scattered on the sand, waiting for a ray of light to pick one out for the passerby … yeah, so I’m slightly incoherent right now.

Today was pretty sweet. I got to play around in the vehicle mock-up, just for the heck of it, and run a simulator through station docking. That’s why I’m an engineer – so I can play with expensive toys (as in, multi-million dollar toys) and get paid for it.

They’ve told us to treat the internship as a three-month-long interview. I don’t think I’ve made a complete idiot of myself yet. (I still have ten weeks to do that, though.)

Continue reading